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Health Report – Obesity on the rise and government is not doing enough to fight it! – I told you its coming!

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The government thinks we are fat. The mayor of NY stops us from 16oz drinks or more. I told you whats next – they will decrease portion size, they will fore us by laws & taxes to be their perfect citizen. Understand social engineering – the government thinks they know best. PLEASE READ GEORGE ORWELLS ANIMAL FARM – its happening slowly

This administration and our current “leader” are not working in the best interest of our country.
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Report Predicts Increase In Obesity Rates In All States, New York To Rise In Rankings.

A new report (pdf) predicting a significant increase in obesity across the US received extensive coverage online, as well as moderate coverage in print. The report, from the Trust for America’s Health (TFAH) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, predicts higher obesity rates in all states by the year 2030.

USA Today (9/19, Hellmich) includes all fifty states’ current obesity rates, and what they are projected to be in 2030. New York currently ties for 42nd out of 51, with Nevada and Connecticut. Only seven states have lower rates today, but New York is projected to have a rate of 50.9% in 2030, higher than 12 states.

According to the Los Angeles Times (9/19, Bardin) “Booster Shots” blog, “The report…projects that Mississippi will continue to lead the nation, with a whopping 66% of its population projected to be obese in 2030, up from 35%.” Meanwhile, “even Colorado, that bastion of fitness perennially sitting at the bottom of the state-by-state obesity rankings, is projected to continue getting fatter, with 45% of its population qualifying as obese by 2030.”

The AP (9/19, Stobbe) reports that the “dismal forecast goes beyond the 42 percent national obesity level that federal health officials project by 2030.” The AP points out that “CDC officials declined to comment on the new report.”

According to The Hill (9/19, Viebeck) “Healthwatch” blog, the report “projects a massive rise in cases of type 2 diabetes, heart disease and other weight-related disorders as Americans gain substantial weight.”

On its website, ABC News (9/19, Braun) reports, “The cost of treating these preventable obesity-related diseases is estimated to increase from $18 billion per year in 2011 to $66 billion per year by 2030.”

Modern Healthcare (9/19, Barr, Subscription Publication) reports, “The loss in economic productivity was estimated by the study, called ‘F as in Fat: How Obesity Threatens America’s Future 2012,’ to be between $390 billion and $580 billion annually by 2030”

The Washington Post (9/19, Kliff) “Wonkblog” reports, however, that “TFAH models a separate future where the obesity rate rises 5 percent more slowly than it has historically. If that happened, ‘every state except Florida would save between 6.5 percent and 7.8 percent in obesity-related health costs.'”

CNN (9/19, Landau) reports, “The report recommends several policy interventions, such as increasing physical activity in schools, supporting healthy nutrition, putting in place new standards for school meals, and promoting preventive health care services.”

New York City Official Urges Stronger Government Role In Obesity Fight.

Bloomberg News (9/19, Pettypiece) reports, “Governments should regulate food companies on unhealthy ingredients in products that contribute to obesity, an epidemic that now affects one in three Americans and costs the US $150 billion a year, said New York City Health Commissioner Thomas Farley.” His city’s “limit on sugary soft drink sales is one example of the steps governments must take to stop the rise of obesity, he said today at a press conference on the topic held by the Journal of the American Medical Association.” Approximately “60 percent of adults in New York City are overweight or obese and one in eight have diabetes, which is often caused by obesity, Farley said.”

MedPage Today (9/19, Fiore) reports, “In a commentary in a special issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association dedicated to obesity,” Farley wrote, “To do nothing is to invite even higher rates of obesity, diabetes, and related mortality.” He “argues that government has a long history of passing policies that protect public health, including restaurant inspections to prevent foodborne disease and seat belt laws that blunt the impact of car crashes – even though none of these are as deadly as obesity.”

Ok – lets review – seatbelt laws – insurance companies lobbied for this – so if we are safer in our cars, then why do our insurance rates continue to skyrocket? The answer is that while seat belts will reduce your injuries, the law was not designed for you BUT to keep the insurance companies from paying more for injuries. WAKE UP PEOPLE! MY insurance rates have NEVER gone down – 28 years diving NEVER an accident and they continue to rise YET we are safer? Please explain this.

Food allergies – excellent point here that our government must ensure proper procedures are done to protect us. Procedures in food preparation for restaurants, driving skills, stock trading etc… NOT HOW MUCH WE SHOULD EAT!

What os the proper weight for anyone? The tables continue to change – I am 217lbs, 5’8″ – i am considered obese! Yet i am muscular, can run several miles and work out for MY OWN BENEFIT. hence according to the government, i am a “problem – i am a diseased” The government tables state I should weight 155 lbs – are we kidding here!

So what will happen? We will be penalized by higher taxes because we are not the proper weight, pay higher health care insurance because we are not the proper physique for the government”

These are undeniable! Its happening now!

We need to be “educated” in what we do, how we eat, how we work, how we live!

Calorie Disclosure Campaigns Scrutinized.

In an op-ed appearing in the New York Times(9/19, Subscription Publication), Martin Bruegel, a historian at the French National Institute for Agricultural Research, wrote “while the alarm over obesity is fairly recent, the notion of using ‘scientific’ knowledge to guide the dietary habits of ordinary people – particularly the less well off – is not.” After noting that McDonald’s is beginning to post calorie information on its menus and that New York City requires chain restaurants to post calories, Bruegel asserts that “the fate of earlier campaigns suggests that it will take much more than calorie information to change food ways.” The op-ed concludes that “higher incomes and better educations – in the classroom, not on the menu board – will do more to solve the obesity epidemic than mandating the disclosure of calorie counts.”

Calorie Disclosure Campaigns Scrutinized.

In an op-ed appearing in the New York Times (9/19, Subscription Publication), Martin Bruegel, a historian at the French National Institute for Agricultural Research, wrote “while the alarm over obesity is fairly recent, the notion of using ‘scientific’ knowledge to guide the dietary habits of ordinary people – particularly the less well off – is not.” After noting that McDonald’s is beginning to post calorie information on its menus and that New York City requires chain restaurants to post calories, Bruegel asserts that “the fate of earlier campaigns suggests that it will take much more than calorie information to change food ways.” The op-ed concludes that “higher incomes and better educations – in the classroom, not on the menu board – will do more to solve the obesity epidemic than mandating the disclosure of calorie counts.”