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Feds look to health IT to improve behavioral health

I do not care for the intent of the title of this article – no matter what the article reads, it states to me that the feds want to change my or your behavior using technology – sounds socialistic to me – ever read George Orwell s, 1984? Read on – way to many parallels for my liking – what do you think?

Nineteen Eighty-Four is a novel by George Orwell published in 1949. It is a dystopian and satirical novel set in Oceania, where society is tyrannized by The Party and its totalitarian ideology.[1] The Oceanian province of Airstrip One is a world of perpetual war, omnipresent government surveillance, and public mind control, dictated by a political system euphemistically named English Socialism (Ingsoc) under the control of a privileged Inner Party elite that persecutes all individualism and independent thinking as thoughtcrimes.[2] Their tyranny is headed by Big Brother, the quasi-divine Party leader who enjoys an intense cult of personality, but who may not even exist. Big Brother and the Party justify their rule in the name of a supposed greater good.[1] The protagonist of the novel, Winston Smith, is a member of the Outer Party who works for the Ministry of Truth (Minitrue), which is responsible for propaganda and historical revisionism. His job is to re-write past newspaper articles so that the historical record always supports the current party line.[3] Smith is a diligent and skilful worker, but he secretly hates the Party and dreams of rebellion against Big Brother.

As literary political fiction and as dystopian science-fiction, Nineteen Eighty-Four is a classic novel in content, plot, and style. Many of its terms and concepts, such as Big Brother, doublethink, thoughtcrime, Newspeak, and memory hole, have entered everyday use since its publication in 1949. Moreover, Nineteen Eighty-Four popularised the adjective Orwellian, which describes official deception, secret surveillance, and manipulation of the past by a totalitarian or authoritarian state

Feds look to health IT to improve behavioral health
By Dan Bowman

The federal government will hand out more than $4 million in grants nationwide in an effort to use health information technology to help substance abuse and mental health professionals in underserved areas, according to an announcement.

The six U.S. Department of Health & Human Services’ Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) grants range from $718,000 to $840,000. According to SAMHSA, grant recipients will use the money to pay for technologies such as smartphones, behavioral health electronic applications and web-based services to improve communications, tracking and management efforts.

Among the grantees are the Iowa Department of Public Health in Des Moines, slated to receive $838,200; the Irene Stacy Community Mental Health Center in Butler, Pa., which will receive $718,547; and Promesa Behavioral Health, Inc., in Fresno, Calif., which will receive $840,000.

The grants are part of a three-year effort announced by SAMHSA last October that will provide up to $25 million to a total of 29 behavioral health treatment programs across the U.S.

Momentum for incentivizing the use of technology for behavioral health and substance abuse providers has been steadily growing of late. A bill introduced to the House earlier this summer by Rep. Tim Murphy (R-Pa.) seeks to extend Meaningful Use incentives to eligible providers who offer such treatment. What’s more, the Rhode Island Quality Institute in March received a $600,000 grant from the federal government to extend access to its statewide health information exchange to behavioral health providers.